And now, onto the thorny issue of legality. The simple answer to the question is yes – if it is extracted from hemp. The 2014 Farm Bill established guidelines for growing hemp in the U.S. legally. This so-called  “industrial hemp” refers to both hemp and hemp products which come from cannabis plants with less than 0.3 percent THC and are grown by a state-licensed farmer.
We gave the highest points to companies that use a CBD distillate for their tinctures. The process of distillation creates an extract that is pure on a molecular level. There are people who think distillate is too pure, and that a full spectrum decarb produces a more effective tincture. But in light of the inconclusive evidence, we prefer a distillate. The process allows for a high degree of control as to the finished product. It’s also odorless and tasteless, so those tinctures tend to taste better.
This is a hugely beneficial effect of CBD. Free radicals are the culprits when it comes to oxidative damage and inflammation. But CBD’s antioxidant properties can help to combat the negative effects of everyday exposure to elements that increase the production of free radicals. These elements include pervasive, but hugely unsurprising, things like:
Hi Diane, we wanted to give some feedback on this subject. Our products are made from hemp which is naturally low in THC, however, they do contain federally acceptable levels of THC. Our full spectrum products contain up to 0.3% THC by weight. Our isolate based tinctures have an undetectable level of THC per our testing standards. However, we do not recommend CBD products for those who are worried about drug testing as there are many shared compounds between hemp and marijuana that could cause a false positive.
Not to be confused with its botanical cousin marijuana, premium hemp oil is extracted from the hemp plant. While hemp and marijuana share many of the same beneficial compounds—cannabinoids, terpenes, and antioxidant flavonoids—there is one important difference. Hemp has only trace amounts of THC, the psychoactive compound found in high amounts in marijuana, so there is no “high” when taking full spectrum hemp oil, just health benefits.
When seeking out Full Spectrum products, you may come across some called “Broad Spectrum” that claim to have 0% THC. It’s important to verify lab tests on these products to make sure that this is not a false claim and you’re encouraged to still exercise caution with these products if drug testing is a concern. These products have sometimes gone through additional processing to try to isolate and remove as much THC as possible while still maintaining some of the other cannabinoids and terpenes.
In the U.S., we live in a culture where more is often perceived as being better.  And it’s easy, without even thinking about it, to apply that approach to CBD dosing. But when it comes to CBD, more is not necessarily better. In fact, for many, less CBD is more effective. One way to determine your optimal dosage is to start with a small amount of CBD for a couple weeks and then slowly increase your dosage, carefully taking note of symptoms, until you’re seeing the results you want.
In fact, numerous studies have looked at the relationship between CBD and pain, and the results are promising. Researchers have looked at various kinds of pain – from joint pain to cancer pain. One finding is that CBD increases levels of glutamate and serotonin – both neurotransmitters that play a role in pain regulation. And CBD’s anti-inflammatory properties help by tackling the root cause of much chronic pain.
The taste of Full Spectrum Hemp CBD Oil is wholesome and hempy without going over the top. The CBD oil blends seamlessly with the hemp seed oil to create a mouth-watering earthy taste that goes exceptionally well with hot beverages as well as cold drinks and a variety of foods. The rosemary extract that is used in the Full Spectrum’s recipe as a natural preservative to ensure freshness gives a fresh, herby tone, and the end result won’t disappoint even the most demanding CBD oil gourmands.
There’s also been a lot of talk lately about “microdosing” CBD. This refers to an incremental process of finding your minimum effective dose. You can do this with any concentration of CBD oil, but lower concentrations will take longer. In a 2017 article in Rolling Stone, Dr. Dustan Sulak outlines his protocol for microdosing. You can begin this process by asking yourself three questions:
While cannabidiol (CBD) is all the rage at present, it is often hard to understand what you are getting. Furthermore, with so many different CBD products on the market it’s hard to tell which are full spectrum, which are not and which products are made from CBD cannabis or CBD hemp.  In this article we will try to clear up any confusion, focusing the major part of the post around Full Spectrum CBD oil.
While there is much debate on which form is better, this 2015 study (http://file.scirp.org/pdf/PP_2015021016351567.pdf) leans in favor of Full Spectrum products. There are many that believe that other cannabinoids, THC especially, are necessary to take full advantage of what cannabis has to offer. Ultimately, however, we are all different and it comes down to the individual user and their needs. If drug testing is a concern, you’re encouraged to seek out CBD isolate products (or terpsolates) instead of Full Spectrum.
The label of this CBD oil tincture was not as easy to read as other products. Palmetto Harmony’s hemp is grown in Kentucky. This family operated business began when CBD offered unique benefits to their ailing child, Harmony. In addition tinctures, they offer topicals, capsules, pet products and even transdermal CBD patches. This tincture was selected by our friends at Anavii Market.

CBD THC Free

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