Mimi says the effective oils are made from the marijuana plant, not hemp. Why are you rating only hemp oils? Are hemp oils the only oils that do not have any THC? The other question that arises is the difference between ml and mg in measuring the strength of these oils. They are quoted as ml, but there is the question of the “density” limit of 95mg? Very confusing.

And now, onto the thorny issue of legality. The simple answer to the question is yes – if it is extracted from hemp. The 2014 Farm Bill established guidelines for growing hemp in the U.S. legally. This so-called  “industrial hemp” refers to both hemp and hemp products which come from cannabis plants with less than 0.3 percent THC and are grown by a state-licensed farmer.


When CBD is in isolate form, it is separated from other cannabis compounds in the source plant. It was previously believed that CBD isolates were more potent and concentrated than full spectrum CBD. This assertion was eventually debunked by a study from the Lautenberg Center for General Tumor Immunology in Jerusalem. In the 2015 study, researchers were able to prove that full spectrum CBD is capable of offering greater levels of relief, as higher doses were administered to mice. By comparison, the group that was given CBD isolate did not experience the same level of relief at higher doses.
Finally, in general, we almost always recommend full spectrum tinctures over supplements made from isolates (extracts of CBD alone). Full-spectrum or whole plant tinctures take advantage of the ‘entourage effect’ that comes from combining all the naturally occurring chemicals found in the hemp plant. Isolates are great for cooking with CBD or consumers that are especially sensitive to the taste of hemp extract, but some research suggests they may be less effective for certain uses than full spectrum extracts. All but two of the brands below are made from full spectrum hemp, and the exceptions are clearly noted.
Tetrahydrocannabinol is the most abundant cannabinoid in most medical and recreational marijuana strains. However, in hemp THC is a minor constituent and appears only in trace amounts under 0.3% by dry weight, as required by the U.S. government for hemp products. THC mimics the action of anandamide, a neurotransmitter naturally produced in the human body, and binds to CB1 receptors in the endocannabinoid system found mostly in the brain. The extremely low levels of THC in hemp make hemp oil non-psychoactive and safe for all ages to use.
All this talk about THC lands us nicely in the whole “Full Spectrum vs. Pure Isolate” debate. Once you begin shopping for CBD products, you’ll notice a lot of jargon that gets thrown around without much explanation. Now that we’ve introduced THC into the conversation, we can talk about the difference between, and relative benefits of, Full Spectrum CBD and CBD Isolate (and the lesser-known contender: Broad Spectrum).

There’s also been a lot of talk lately about “microdosing” CBD. This refers to an incremental process of finding your minimum effective dose. You can do this with any concentration of CBD oil, but lower concentrations will take longer. In a 2017 article in Rolling Stone, Dr. Dustan Sulak outlines his protocol for microdosing. You can begin this process by asking yourself three questions:
Being a hyperaccumulator also has drawbacks: If a hemp plant that is used in production of CBD oil was cultivated in a land that is rich in heavy metals such as mercury and lead, the resulting oils will also reflect the amount of heavy metals absorbed by the plant, making it unsafe for humans to consume, especially children or others who are extremely vulnerable to toxins.
So, the next question is typically:  DO I NEED ALL THESE OTHER CANNABINOIDS TO HELP MY CANCER (or epilepsy, diabetes, etc)?  The answer is “maybe”.  Some people find great results from cannabidiol or CBD alone.  But, more people typically report better results when taking a full spectrum of cannabinoids (sometimes this includes THC, but often times, not).  So, if you’re new to CBD and not sure what direction to go, these reports from people would generally indicate its best to try a full spectrum blend to give you the greatest chance of success.  While having an extract that includes specifically the cannabinoid THC could also increase your chance for success, you have to ask yourself if you want to be ‘high’ all day when taking CBD.  And, you have to consider whether CBD extracted from marijuana is legal where you are.  Because of these two questions, CBD as part of a full spectrum of cannabinoid extracted from hemp, is often times the desired choice.
I have fibromyalgia and piriformious syndrome (severe hip/leg pain) and for the past six months have been dealing with extreme pain and insomnia. Having exhausted all tricks, remedies, doctors, and medications without relief I decided to try Cbd oil. After only two days I have slept like a baby, had hours of continuous deep sleep, sleep app confirmed this. The Hip/leg pain is dulled, but dulled enough that I can do therapy stretches without screaming or crying. The nerve pain from fibro feels like it is asleep! It is the most amazing thing not to feel every nerve in your body after three years of constant pain. The cbd oil does give me a slight tummy ache after taking it but goes away in about an hour. And I do mean slight ache. So far no side effects or interactions. ( Will up date if do)
Due to its non-psychoactive healing properties, Cannabidiol (CBD) has become a very popular option for patients seeking a natural alternative to treat conditions such as chronic pain, anxiety, epilepsy, and more. As patients start to understand how CBD can be used to alleviate their symptoms, they are often faced with a choice between using products made from CBD Isolate or Full Spectrum CBD. So, what exactly is the difference between the two?
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