These studies conclude that “the higher efficiency of plant extract can be explained by additive or synergistic interactions between CBD, terpenes, and the minor phytocannabinoids or non-cannabinoids presented in the extracts. …because other phytocannabinoids, including Tetrahydrocannabivarin, Cannabigerol and Cannabichromene, as well as mono- and sesqui- terpenes, exert additional effects of therapeutic interest and the therapeutic synergy observed with plant extracts results in the requirement for a lower amount of active components, with consequent reduced adverse effects.”
So, the next question is typically:  DO I NEED ALL THESE OTHER CANNABINOIDS TO HELP MY CANCER (or epilepsy, diabetes, etc)?  The answer is “maybe”.  Some people find great results from cannabidiol or CBD alone.  But, more people typically report better results when taking a full spectrum of cannabinoids (sometimes this includes THC, but often times, not).  So, if you’re new to CBD and not sure what direction to go, these reports from people would generally indicate its best to try a full spectrum blend to give you the greatest chance of success.  While having an extract that includes specifically the cannabinoid THC could also increase your chance for success, you have to ask yourself if you want to be ‘high’ all day when taking CBD.  And, you have to consider whether CBD extracted from marijuana is legal where you are.  Because of these two questions, CBD as part of a full spectrum of cannabinoid extracted from hemp, is often times the desired choice.

While cannabidiol (CBD) is all the rage at present, it is often hard to understand what you are getting. Furthermore, with so many different CBD products on the market it’s hard to tell which are full spectrum, which are not and which products are made from CBD cannabis or CBD hemp.  In this article we will try to clear up any confusion, focusing the major part of the post around Full Spectrum CBD oil.
Cannabinol results from the degradation of THC. There is little of it in the fresh plant, but decarboxylation often raises the amount of CBN in the plant as an effect. CBN is only mildly psychoactive and has a higher affinity for the CB2 receptor than the CB1 receptor, linking CBN to the body’s immune system. In hemp oil, CBN is present in levels of 0.2% or lower.

Essential fatty acids are necessary for maintaining heart and cardiovascular health. The two primary essential fatty acids — Omega 3 and Omega 6 — are ideally consumed at a ratio of around 3:1. Unfortunately, in the typical American diet, that ratio is close to 25:1. Full-spectrum hemp oil offers the two essential fatty acids in the optimal 3:1 ratio.
Strength is also an extremely important consideration. Beginners may find that it’s easier to control dosage using a lower strength tincture. On the other hand, experienced CBD consumers know that high strength tinctures are more cost effective. Although stronger tinctures cost more, you get more CBD oil and other beneficial cannabinoids in each drop. Most CBD brands offer more than one option for strength.
The aforementioned entourage effect is the main reason behind the efficacy of whole plant extracts. There are over 100 ‘identified’ compounds in the cannabis plant. While most of these compounds have their own therapeutic benefit, they combine synergistically to provide a far better performance than any single compound, including CBD. Here are a couple of examples of conditions that benefit from the entourage effect:

CBD Oil Full Spectrum

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