When seeking out Full Spectrum products, you may come across some called “Broad Spectrum” that claim to have 0% THC. It’s important to verify lab tests on these products to make sure that this is not a false claim and you’re encouraged to still exercise caution with these products if drug testing is a concern. These products have sometimes gone through additional processing to try to isolate and remove as much THC as possible while still maintaining some of the other cannabinoids and terpenes.
So, the next question is typically:  DO I NEED ALL THESE OTHER CANNABINOIDS TO HELP MY CANCER (or epilepsy, diabetes, etc)?  The answer is “maybe”.  Some people find great results from cannabidiol or CBD alone.  But, more people typically report better results when taking a full spectrum of cannabinoids (sometimes this includes THC, but often times, not).  So, if you’re new to CBD and not sure what direction to go, these reports from people would generally indicate its best to try a full spectrum blend to give you the greatest chance of success.  While having an extract that includes specifically the cannabinoid THC could also increase your chance for success, you have to ask yourself if you want to be ‘high’ all day when taking CBD.  And, you have to consider whether CBD extracted from marijuana is legal where you are.  Because of these two questions, CBD as part of a full spectrum of cannabinoid extracted from hemp, is often times the desired choice.
The aforementioned entourage effect is the main reason behind the efficacy of whole plant extracts. There are over 100 ‘identified’ compounds in the cannabis plant. While most of these compounds have their own therapeutic benefit, they combine synergistically to provide a far better performance than any single compound, including CBD. Here are a couple of examples of conditions that benefit from the entourage effect:

CBD Oil Full Spectrum

×