Like any manufactured product, one of the best ways to ensure quality is to use high-quality materials. This is especially important in CBD oil because of the hemp plant’s characteristic as  a “hyperaccumulator.” This means that the hemp plant easily absorbs anything that is present in the ground that it was cultivated and farmed. If a hemp plant grew on rich soil, the resulting plant will be of high quality that can produce CBD oil in the same high-quality as well.
Although low, the original amount of THC present in hemp may still cause a certain level of psychoactive effects when processed incorrectly. Remember, CBD oil is made from the extracts of hundreds, even thousands, of hemp plants, therefore, no matter how small a percentage of THC there is in hemp, it may still have a high concentration on CBD oils that have been processed poorly, especially since the equipment needed to properly process CBD oil from hemp can be costly.
Strength is also an extremely important consideration. Beginners may find that it’s easier to control dosage using a lower strength tincture. On the other hand, experienced CBD consumers know that high strength tinctures are more cost effective. Although stronger tinctures cost more, you get more CBD oil and other beneficial cannabinoids in each drop. Most CBD brands offer more than one option for strength.
In the U.S., we live in a culture where more is often perceived as being better.  And it’s easy, without even thinking about it, to apply that approach to CBD dosing. But when it comes to CBD, more is not necessarily better. In fact, for many, less CBD is more effective. One way to determine your optimal dosage is to start with a small amount of CBD for a couple weeks and then slowly increase your dosage, carefully taking note of symptoms, until you’re seeing the results you want.
There’s also been a lot of talk lately about “microdosing” CBD. This refers to an incremental process of finding your minimum effective dose. You can do this with any concentration of CBD oil, but lower concentrations will take longer. In a 2017 article in Rolling Stone, Dr. Dustan Sulak outlines his protocol for microdosing. You can begin this process by asking yourself three questions:
In the U.S., we live in a culture where more is often perceived as being better.  And it’s easy, without even thinking about it, to apply that approach to CBD dosing. But when it comes to CBD, more is not necessarily better. In fact, for many, less CBD is more effective. One way to determine your optimal dosage is to start with a small amount of CBD for a couple weeks and then slowly increase your dosage, carefully taking note of symptoms, until you’re seeing the results you want.
While there is much debate on which form is better, this 2015 study (http://file.scirp.org/pdf/PP_2015021016351567.pdf) leans in favor of Full Spectrum products. There are many that believe that other cannabinoids, THC especially, are necessary to take full advantage of what cannabis has to offer. Ultimately, however, we are all different and it comes down to the individual user and their needs. If drug testing is a concern, you’re encouraged to seek out CBD isolate products (or terpsolates) instead of Full Spectrum.
There are over 80+ beneficial compounds that are naturally found in hemp. Collectively these compounds are called cannabinoids. When you take hemp oil, you support your endocannabinoid system which explains why people all over the world are using hemp oil to help calm the effects of temporary inflammation, ease stress and everyday discomfort, and improve the quality of sleep.
When CBD is in isolate form, it is separated from other cannabis compounds in the source plant. It was previously believed that CBD isolates were more potent and concentrated than full spectrum CBD. This assertion was eventually debunked by a study from the Lautenberg Center for General Tumor Immunology in Jerusalem. In the 2015 study, researchers were able to prove that full spectrum CBD is capable of offering greater levels of relief, as higher doses were administered to mice. By comparison, the group that was given CBD isolate did not experience the same level of relief at higher doses.

The taste of Full Spectrum Hemp CBD Oil is wholesome and hempy without going over the top. The CBD oil blends seamlessly with the hemp seed oil to create a mouth-watering earthy taste that goes exceptionally well with hot beverages as well as cold drinks and a variety of foods. The rosemary extract that is used in the Full Spectrum’s recipe as a natural preservative to ensure freshness gives a fresh, herby tone, and the end result won’t disappoint even the most demanding CBD oil gourmands.


So, with all this talk of marijuana and THC and being ‘high’, we typically find the next question to be: IS CBD LEGAL.  And, as you are probably well aware, there are several states where CBD extracts from marijuana are legal, there are many more that are not.  But, point blank, CBD extracted from hemp, whether singularly or as a full spectrum cannabinoid blend, is legal in all 50 states.

Unfortunately, it’s not always easy for consumers to determine which CBD brands and product claims’ are trustworthy. With the growth in popularity of CBD oil, new brands and merchants are coming out every day with promises to offer you the best, high-quality supplement. However, there are few regulations, if any, to help monitor and regulate these claims.
The health benefits of full-spectrum hemp go beyond it being a source of CBD. The array of cannabinoids and other natural constituents found in full-spectrum hemp oil work have been shown in studies to work together in what’s referred to as the “entourage effect.” Together, these compounds work harmoniously to magnify their therapeutic properties. The complex mix of cannabinoids, essential nutrients, protein, and healthy fats work synergistically to encourage homeostasis and balance in our health.

Hemp CBD Oil Full Spectrum

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