Tetrahydrocannabinol, or THC, is one of the cannabinoids present in both marijuana and agricultural hemp, and it is the substance responsible for giving a psychoactive effect on the body. It is what gives a user a “high.” The reason why hemp is used over marijuana when creating CBD oil is because of the former’s innate low levels of THC over CBD, making it perfect for CBD oil processing.
Finally, in general, we almost always recommend full spectrum tinctures over supplements made from isolates (extracts of CBD alone). Full-spectrum or whole plant tinctures take advantage of the ‘entourage effect’ that comes from combining all the naturally occurring chemicals found in the hemp plant. Isolates are great for cooking with CBD or consumers that are especially sensitive to the taste of hemp extract, but some research suggests they may be less effective for certain uses than full spectrum extracts. All but two of the brands below are made from full spectrum hemp, and the exceptions are clearly noted.
The statements made regarding these products have not been evaluated by the Food and Drug Administration. These products are not intended to diagnose, treat, cure or prevent any disease. Please consult your health care professional about potential interactions or other possible complications before using any product. The Federal Food, Drug and Cosmetic Act requires this notice.

The statements made regarding these products have not been evaluated by the Food and Drug Administration. These products are not intended to diagnose, treat, cure or prevent any disease. Please consult your health care professional about potential interactions or other possible complications before using any product. The Federal Food, Drug and Cosmetic Act requires this notice.

And now, onto the thorny issue of legality. The simple answer to the question is yes – if it is extracted from hemp. The 2014 Farm Bill established guidelines for growing hemp in the U.S. legally. This so-called  “industrial hemp” refers to both hemp and hemp products which come from cannabis plants with less than 0.3 percent THC and are grown by a state-licensed farmer.

CBD is found bonded naturally to fats in many organic sources, most notably within a human mother’s breast milk.  This allows the P-450 enzyme in the liver to naturally break down CBD to then utilize it within the endocannabinoid system.  We replicate this process, in the most organic way we can, through bonding the hemp-derived cannabinoids in MCT Coconut oil.  We want your experience using our hemp oil to be easy and accurate!
To better understand how these two CBD formulas differ, imagine being presented with two types of spaghetti sauce. In the first bowl, you’ll find a simple spaghetti sauce made out of pure tomatoes (CBD isolate). In the second bowl, you can find a more complex spaghetti sauce, containing roasted garlic and fragrant Italian herbs (full spectrum CBD). It’s clear that both bowls are holding spaghetti sauce – but the second recipe is more flavorful and interacts with one’s taste buds differently (also known as the “entourage effect”).

Like any manufactured product, one of the best ways to ensure quality is to use high-quality materials. This is especially important in CBD oil because of the hemp plant’s characteristic as  a “hyperaccumulator.” This means that the hemp plant easily absorbs anything that is present in the ground that it was cultivated and farmed. If a hemp plant grew on rich soil, the resulting plant will be of high quality that can produce CBD oil in the same high-quality as well.


Due to its non-psychoactive healing properties, Cannabidiol (CBD) has become a very popular option for patients seeking a natural alternative to treat conditions such as chronic pain, anxiety, epilepsy, and more. As patients start to understand how CBD can be used to alleviate their symptoms, they are often faced with a choice between using products made from CBD Isolate or Full Spectrum CBD. So, what exactly is the difference between the two?
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